Resources

 

Children’s Investment Fund

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CIF’S FACILITIES INVENTORY REPORTS

October 2011

The "Building an Infrastruture for Quality An Inventory of Early Childhood Education and Out-of-School Time Facilities in Massachusetts" report is the first-ever inventory of early childhood education and out-of-school time facilities in Massachusetts or anywhere in the country. 

 

Also available for download are the following related reports:

1.     Program Facility Standards for Early Care and Education & Out-of-School-Time Programs

2.     The Facilities Inventory Project Data Report

3.     The Facilities Inventory Project Boston Data Report

Click here to visit our “Building an Infrastructure for Quality” report page.

 

Other Publications:

Local Initiative Support Corporation/Rhode Island Child Care Facilities Fund
 

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Child Care Physical Environment Checklist

Published by the Local Initiatives Support Corporation/Rhode Island Child Care Facilities Fund

 Illustrations by: D.W. Arthur Associates

February 2006

"This Checklist was created to help center-based early childhood programs assess the quality of their physical environment. It relies on the standards developed by experts in the early care and education field and on experience gained by LISC staff and consultants in their work with programs across the country." Child Care Physical Environment Checklist 2006; 1.

 

Click here to read this report.

 
 Boston Early Education Quality Improvement Project
 

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Boston Quality Inventory 2013: Community Early Care and Education Programs

March 10, 2014

Marshall, NL, Robeson, WW. & Roberts, J. 2014. Boston Quality Inventory 2013: Community Early Care and Education Programs. Wellesley Centers for Women, Wellesley College, Wellesley, MA

 

"The Boston Quality Inventory (BQI) provides a picture of the current quality of family child care homes and center-based programs serving infants, toddlers and preschoolers throughout the city.   The report provides critical information to help Boston policy-makers, service providers and funders assess city-wide progress on the Thrive in 5 School Readiness Roadmap, which sets goals and strategies for strengthening, coordinating and improving the quality of child and family-serving systems in the city, in order to prepare children to succeed in school."

 

Click here to read this report.

 
American Academy of Pediatrics

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Policy Statement
The Crucial Role of Recess in School

COUNCIL ON SCHOOL HEALTH

Pediatrics 2013;131;183; originally published online December 31, 2012;
DOI: 10.1542/peds.2012-2993
Copyright © 2013 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

“Recess is at the heart of a vigorous debate over the role of schools in promoting the optimal development of the whole child. A growing trend toward reallocating time in school to accentuate the more academic subjects has put this important facet of a child’s school day at risk. Recess serves as a necessary break from the rigors of concentrated, academic challenges in the classroom. But equally important is the fact that safe and well-supervised recess offers cognitive, social, emotional, and physical benefits that may not be fully appreciated when a decision is made to diminish it. Recess is unique from, and a complement to, physical education—not a substitute for it. The American Academy of Pediatrics believes that recess is a crucial and necessary component of a child’s development and, as such, it should not be withheld for punitive or academic reasons." Pediatrics 2013;131:183–188

Click here to download this report.

 

Illinois Facilities Fund (IFF)

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The Building Blocks of Design: A Handbook for Early Childhood Development Facilities

October 2004

“A guide and reference tool for early childhood development providers who want to improve or expand their centers. The handbook covers everything from choosing a paint color for a simple cosmetic enhancement to planning a major construction project.”

Click here to download this report.

Great Spaces Fresh Places:
How to Improve Environments for School-Age Programs

Commissioned by MOST
(Making the Most of Out of School Time)

Second Edition 2001

“Documentation of three classroom makeovers, a collaboration between IFF and The Chicago MOST Initiative.”

 

“For child care providers, program space can represent a particular challenge… The purpose of this publication is to demonstrate simple, creative solutions to common facility problems in spaces used for out-of-school activities… But this manual seeks to demonstrate that—with a creative and realistic approach to needs, resources, and possibilities—it is possible for any space to complement, enhance, and enrich the out-of-school activities that take place within it.”

Click here to download this report.

 

Local Initiatives Support Corporations (LISC) & LISC Community Investment Collaborative for Kids (CICK)
"The Community Investment Collaborative for Kids (CICK) is the national early childhood facilities arm of the Local Initiatives Support Corporation, the nation's largest nonprofit community development support program. CICK increases the quality and capacity of early childhood programs by providing technical assistance and financial support on individual facility projects; crafting new financing mechanisms; influencing public policy; and sharing best practices on facility design and development. The program emphasizes the connection between well-designed facilities and high-quality programming, and the need for capital subsidies and creative financing to make these investments feasible."

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CICK Resource Guide
Volumes 1 - 4

10/13/2005

Volume 1: Developing Early Childhood Facilities
Carl Sussman, Amy Gillman and Cindy Larson

Volume 2: Designing Early Childhood Facilities
Dogan W. Arthur, Cindy Larson, Amy Gillman and Carl Sussman

Volume 3: Equipping and Furnishing Early Childhood Facilities
Mav Pardee

Volume 4: Creating Playgrounds for Early Childhood Facilities
Mav Pardee, Amy Gillman, and Cindy Larson

Click here to download Volume 1.
Click here to download Volume 2.
Click here to download Volume 3.
Click here to download Volume 4.

 

CICK Resource Guide: Greening early childhood centers

12/01/2010

Authors: Mike Lindstrom and Amy Gillman

"Greening Early Childhood Centers highlights high-impact green design and capital investment strategies that can be implemented over the long term, as well as low-cost/no-cost ideas for physical improvements, environmental education and facilities operations that early childhood centers can undertake right away."

Click here to download this report.

CICK Resource Guide: Creating Quality School-Age Child Care Space

10/04/2011

Authors: Katie Winter and Ruth Gyuse

"Creating Quality School-Age Child Care Space  reflects best practices in the design and improvement of school-age child care environments for children from kindergarten through eighth grade, offering many simple, low-cost solutions in addition to more ambitious strategies."

Click here to download this report.

CICK Resource Guide -
The ABCs of Child Care

07/31/2008

Authors: Amy Gillman, Cindy Larson,
Mav Pardee and Carl Sussman

"The ABCs of Child Care was created to introduce community development organizations to the child care field, and help them partner effectively with early care and education providers to build or improve their facilities. It includes information about different types of child care programs and settings; steps for finding a suitable program operator; an overview of operating costs and revenue sources; and potential roles for community developers."

Click here to download this report.

Building Early Childhood Facilities: What States Can Do to Create Supply and Promote Quality

08/06/2007

Authors: Carl Sussman with Amy Gillman

Publisher: National Institute for Early Education Research (NIEER) and LISC

"Fueled by mounting evidence that quality early education helps close the achievement gap, most states are increasing their investments in preschool programs for 3- and 4-year-olds. To help policymakers address the resulting need for new facilities, LISC’s Community Investment Collaborative for Kids partnered with Rutgers University’s National Institute for Early Education and Research to produce a policy brief on Building Early Childhood Facilities. The brief outlines strategies for successfully financing, designing and developing high quality preschool facilities."

Click here to download this report.

Child Care Facilities:
Quality By Design

06/28/2004

Authors: Tony Proscio, Carl Sussman & Amy Gillman

"This report highlights research conducted at a Connecticut early childhood center that demonstrates how a well-designed facility can result in more frequent teacher-child interactions, more productive child-initiated play, higher staff morale, and lower staff turnover - all essential factors in program quality. The paper also offers examples of successful efforts to create high quality child care facilities in communities supported by LISC around the country."

Click here to download this report.

 

National Clearinghouse for Educational Facilities (NCEF)

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Early Childhood Centers

By: Dan Butin & Jennifer Woolums

National Clearinghouse for Educational Facilities (NCEF)

2009

“Addresses how early childhood center design can improve the quality of these centers in terms of health, safety, and the appropriate development of the child. It briefly explores educational trends involving early childhood centers, then addresses the key spaces in these centers designers should focus on, including the classroom, outdoor space, multipurpose room, health center, teachers' work space, and administrative area. It also explores the key issues in designing early childhood centers concerning health and safety, developmentally appropriate environment, play areas, and overall size. Final comments discuss placing early childhood centers in schools.”

Click here to read this report.

Children's Spaces.

Editor: Mark Dudek

Architectural Press, Oct 2010
(2010 e-book version of a 2005 publication)

(Found via NCEF)

This collection of essays is concerned with the experiences children have within the supervised worlds they inhabit, as well as with architecture and landscape architecture. International examples of innovative childcare practice are illustrated together with the design processes which informed their development. Research supports in depth recommendations regarding the ideal children's environment, across a range of contexts and dimensions.”

Click here to read this e-book.

Child Development Centers [Whole Building Design Guide]

By: WBDG Subcommittee
National Institute of Building Sciences, Washington, D.C.
Jul 21, 2010

Found via NCEF
Last updated by Judy Marks, NCEF Director, 04-04-2011

“A child development facility must be designed to provide safe, nurturing, and stimulating environments essential for the healthy development of children. This section of the Whole Building Design Guide provides information on the types of spaces in a facility, and discusses the following recommendations: Be Homelike; Be Child Sized; Encourage Autonomy; Invite Self-Expression; Provide Space, Indoor and Outdoor Physical Activities; Have Outdoor and Indoor Spaces for Nature; Be Structured, Yet Flexible; Include Appropriate Space for Parents and Teachers; and Be Safe, Secure, and Healthy. Includes relevant codes and standards and additional resources.”

Photo from the article.

 

Click here to read this article.

Infant and Toddler Spaces: Design for a Quality Classroom.

Community Playthings and WestEd Program for Infant/Toddler Care, 2010

(Found via NCEF)

“This report discusses the importance of the surroundings and playthings to the individual development of infants and toddlers. Eight characteristics are considered for quality infant/toddler environments: (1) safety, (2) health, (3) comfort, (4) convenience, (5) child-size space, (6) flexibility, (7) movement, and (8) choice. The following considerations are offered for the architect: (1) involve teachers, parents, and children in the design process; (2) licensing standards do not always support the developmental needs of children; (3) long-term flexibility is important; (4) follow the children's standards by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA); (5) keep doors to a minimum; (6) although natural light is wonderful, be careful about too many windows; (7) consider aspects of floor materials; and (8) acoustic tiles are nice for ceilings. Various floor plans are included.” [Author's abstract]

Click here to read this e-book.

 

Policy Archive

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The Economic Impact of the Child Care and Early Education Industry in Massachusetts

Publication Date: January 2004

Publisher(s): National Economic Development and Law Center (U.S.)

Authors Saskia Traill; Jen Wohl

Funder: W.K. Kellogg Foundation

"The child care and early education industry in Massachusetts encompasses a range of programs designed to nurture, support, enrich, and educate children from birth through age 14 outside of traditional K-12 education."

Click here to download this report.

 

White Hutchinson Leisure & Learning Group

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The Great 35 Square Foot Myth

by Randy White & Vicki Stoecklin

2003

This article argues that, contrary to popular belief and licensing standards, 35 square feet per child is not enough. Children need more than 35 square feet of space for proper social, physical and intellectual development.

Click here to read this article.

 

 

Other - Found via the National Children's Facilities Network and DesignShare)

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Design of Child Care Centers and Effects of Noise on Young Children

By: Dr. Lorraine E. Maxwell & Dr. Gary W. Evans
Cornell University

“There is a considerable amount of research documenting the effects of noise on children. The effects are largely negative. In this presentation I will briefly describe the findings of research in this field, discuss current research by Maxwell and Evans, and finally outline design issues related to noise and child care centers.”

Click here to download this report.